Borgman awarded 2016 prize for best Computing & Information Sciences book

Borgman awarded 2016 prize for best Computing & Information Sciences book

Congratulations to Christine Borgman! Her new book, Big Data, Little Data, No Data, received this year’s award for best Computing & Information Sciences book. The award was presented by the Professional and Scholarly Publishing division of the Association of American Publishers (AAP). “The PROSE Awards annually recognize the very best in professional and scholarly publishing by bringing attention to distinguished books, journals, and electronic content…”. Click here for more information on Borgman’s accomplishment....
CKI Advisory Board Meeting held January 22, 2016

CKI Advisory Board Meeting held January 22, 2016

On January 22, we hosted our five advisory board members, and Sloan Program Director,  for a full day of analysis at the UCLA Department of Information Studies. We thank each of our guests for granting us a full day to thinking through and prioritizing future directions of our work....
Pasquetto presents research analyzing publicly available data on officer-involved homicides

Pasquetto presents research analyzing publicly available data on officer-involved homicides

UCLA KI team member, Irene Pasquetto, was a presenter at the UCLA Information Studies Colloquium on Thursday January 14th. Pasquetto and her colleagues presented their work analyzing the availability and usability Police Officer-Involved Homicides data in Los Angeles. Their project abstract is below and more information about the project can be found at: http://www.poihomicides.org/     This multifaceted project investigates police officer-involved homicide (POIH) data as a mechanism for fostering civic data literacy, accountability and political action that challenges existing policies. To do this, we conducted a hackathon as a component of participatory action research, as we draw from the field of statactivism to reason that through acts of statistical reappropriation and intervention, data can provide a means of wresting control of the power of certain ‘authoritative’ metrics by challenging them or devising new ones. As an extension of critique, counter data efforts confront official indicators by illuminating the consequences of resulting policies or proposing alternative collection methods, definitions, and values not taken into account by these measures. From such a vantage, we interrogate how a life taken becomes rationalized and processed as a data point, and how the lived experience of a community’s loss becomes a statistic with explanatory power.  ...